Contemplating eyelid surgery?

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Eyelid surgery is more properly known as blepharoplasty with upper or lower referring to the area of the eye that will be treated.

An upper blepharoplasty can improve the appearance of your eyes by making them “open up” giving them a bigger and brighter appearance.

Many people, and not just women, complain of having “tired eyes” as they get older. This is often due to sagging and loss of elasticity of the skin around the eyes.

 

Blepharoplasty can rejuvenate this tired-eye appearance, but you must have realistic expectations.You can’t go into the doctor’s office think that when they are done that you will now be looking like Miss America.

How does blepharoplasty perk up my eyes?

Upper blepharoplasty removes excess fat from underneath the skin of the upper eyelids. It is this fat that makes eyes appear puffy. Also, it can tighten loose or sagging skin that creates folds making one look older than they are. This is called an eyelid lift.

Lower blepharoplasty removes excess skin and fine wrinkles from the lower eyelid. This procedure also addresses eye bags and can correct the droopiness that causes the whites of the eyes to be revealed.

Is this surgery done under general anesthesia?

While it can be done under general anesthesia, most plastic surgeons prefer local anesthesia because they prefer an active patient that can open and close their eyes, allowing for better results.

Isn’t it painful if this surgery is done under local anesthesia?

While there is an initial sting of pain as the surgeon injects the local anesthetic needed for numbing. This pain is no more than that of ant bite. After that, your skin is numb and you don’t feel any pain. However, the feeling of minor discomfort as the tissues are worked is normal.

Should you feel pain when the surgeon is working the deeper tissues, they can up your anesthesia with a few more injections, which won’t sting like the first one because your face is already numb.

What do I need to do before surgery?

Since this is an out-patient procedure, make arrangements for someone to drive you to the surgery and back. While you may believe that you can drive yourself, after the surgery there will be substantial swelling around the eyes, so don’t risk it.

Prior to surgery you will be given some antibiotics, so eat something unless you are told not to by your doctor. Also, it is recommended that you stop taking aspirin or any other analgesic that may also be a blood thinner.

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What should I expect after the surgery?

Lots of swelling and bruising around your eyes is normal after surgery and this will get worse the day after the surgery, but then will begin to subside after that. Additionally, there may be some oozing around the stiches as well as some excessive tears, which could be bloody, but all this is to be expected.

You must avoid exercising and the carrying heavy objects during the first week post-surgery because this can cause swelling. Contact your doctor immediately if you have any questions or feel that something is not right.

When should I see the results of my surgery?

Most results will be evident after several weeks, but it can take up to a year for the incision lines to completely blend in.

Blepharoplasty is typically done only once in a lifetime because the results will last for many years. Keep in mind though that you will continue to age naturally after the procedure.

What complications are possible?

As with any medical procedure or surgery, there is always the risk of complications yet this does not mean that they will happen to you.

Possible complications include: scarring, temporary blurred or impaired vision, difficulty in closing your eyes, dry eyes, bleeding and the formation of a hematoma, fluid accumulation, blood clots, infection, numbness or changes in skin sensation, and the worse possible complication, loss of eyesight.

Again, these are only possible complications and they are very rare.

Staff @ MexicaliMedicalGuide
April 4, 2013
(Source Article: www.thestar.com.my)

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